2006 C1D21: Does Healthy Eating Make You Feel Isolated?

I posted this as a question on Pink Dumbbells, but I figured it would be enlightening to hear what my blog readers thought about this issue as well:

Many of us in the online fitness community have made the conscious decision to change our eating habits to support weight loss, muscle gain, athletic performance, or other goals. This usually entails eating 5-6 small meals a day with overall higher protein, vegetable, and fruit intake levels than are typical for the average Jane or Joe.

It may also mean not dipping into the office candy jar, saying “No thanks” when the pie a la mode is brought out at Thanksgiving dinner, or settling for a glass of water or Diet Coke when you go out on the town with your friends and co-workers.

I thought it would be interesting to share our experiences regarding this topic.

  • How has your transition from “normal” eating to “healthy” eating gone?
  • Was it easy or difficult?
  • Do your family, friends, and co-workers support you or do you feel like they sometimes try to sabotage you?
  • Do you feel left out (or singled out) at social occasions involving food and drinks because of what you do or do not eat?
  • How important a role does food play in your family gatherings and traditions?
  • How do you normally cope with the pressure to eat like everybody else at a social event or situation? Do you give in or stand firm?

My own answers will be posted in the comments of this post.

========================================================
2/28 Report
(*Diet and workout details omitted by agreement with trainer)
==========
Nutrition:

Meals – On plan (Combined meals 5 & 6, but stayed within calories and macros)
Water – 16 cups
Supplements – On plan

Regular (Non-Plan) Daily Supplements – multivitamin with iron, calcium 600 + D

20 days down, 64 more to go!

===========
Workout:

Weights – Postponed until Wednesday due to Mom’s bday
Cardio – 40 minutes LISS run @ 6 mph – Done

===========
The Awful Truth:
1. Nothing!

===========
Brownie Points:
1. Got to bed by 11 pm!
2. Installed UddeIM 0.4 private message upgrade for Pink Dumbbells.
3. Stayed on track during Mom’s birthday dinner.

===========
Short-term Goals:
1. Work on paper doll sketches.
2. Fix remaining issues with Joomla migration at Pinkdumbbells.com.
3. Locate new Events module for PDB.
4. Upgrade Community Builder component at PDB.
5. Set up archived version of The Training Journal forum at PDB from Hershey Girl’s backup.
6. Upgrade WordPress to 2.0.
7. Transplant two tomato vines and plant Swiss Chard.
8. Buy more chicken breast.
9. Clear out mail inbox at home.
10. Finish taxes.
11. File receipts and statements.
12. Organize office.

3 thoughts on “2006 C1D21: Does Healthy Eating Make You Feel Isolated?

  1. * How has your transition from “normal” eating to “healthy” eating gone?
    I actually didn’t have a very hard time switching from my old 3 meals/day to 6 meals/day. I tended to have snacks between breakfast and lunch and then again between lunch and dinner anyway, so I was already eating 5 times a day even before I started BFL. The biggest change was replacing the candy and chips I USED to have as snacks with healthy alternatives.

    * Was it easy or difficult?
    On a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most difficult, I’d rate my transition as a 2. I was living by myself when I started BFL so I had complete control over my fridge and pantry. I also cooked most of my own meals vs. dining out or using pre-packaged meals, which made the shift to preparing my own healthy foods pretty natural.

    * Do your family, friends, and co-workers support you or do you feel like they sometimes try to sabotage you?
    I honestly don’t think anyone around me particularly cares about what I eat or how often I do it. My sister, of course, is a fitness nut like me, so she is actively supportive, but my parents, boyfriend, and co-workers just let me do my own thing without trying to influence me in any way.

    * Do you feel left out (or singled out) at social occasions involving food and drinks because of what you do or do not eat?
    I *grew up* eating stuff that none of my Westerner school mates had ever seen before. I took pan-fried dumplings to school for lunch when everyone else was digging into PB&J sandwiches on Wonder Bread.

    Being dietarily out of step with mainstream America is nothing new to me.

    If I feel any pangs at a social function with food, it isn’t from any perceived or imagined censure from my peers, but from my own brain’s craving for some food items I know aren’t authorized while I’m cutting, LOL.

    * How important a role does food play in your family gatherings and traditions?
    I’d say that food is pretty central to Asian family life. For example, the first words my father always says to me when I walk in his front door are, “Chui tze fan!” (Literally, “Go eat rice!”) Mom is a bit more low-key about it: “Have you eaten yet?”

    Both of my parents are fantastic cooks, and I love just about everything they make.

    * How do you normally cope with the pressure to eat like everybody else at a social event or situation? Do you give in or stand firm?
    It depends on the event, my fitness goals at the time, and whether or not I’ve saved up a free meal or free day for the event. If it’s a free meal/day after a week of clean eating, I will go to town and gloat over the fact that I can eat like a linebacker and still look great while the other women are picking at their celery and carrot sticks and feeling guilty about the fried and sugary finger foods they’ve snuck from the trays. If I’m not due for a free meal and have a very specific cutting goal in mind (or progress photos due), I will stick with the healthy options and ignore the junk.

    In many ways it is helpful obviously be from a different cultural and ethnic background. We live in such a PC world now that most folks hesitate to comment on any of my food choices.

  2. 1) The transition took a long time to convert from previous eating habits. I tried to make habits instead of the Change Everything at Once(tm) method. It seems to have worked for me – kept the weight off for last 14 months.

    2) As far as diets go, it’s been the easiest. Hardest for me was South Beach/Atkins that didn’t work, and made me feel like crap. I’d say a 4 out of 10.

    3) At first I didn’t even mention anything, I just would say no… Like from the 80’s – “Just say No” (aka PTFD! – put the fork down). After I lost 50lbs, my coworkers would make me order first, so they’d know what to get that wasn’t “bad” for them.

    4) Fairly important. My weakness is Potato Chips and Cheese Cake… So, if there’s a family gathering, I just plan ahead and work out extra the day before, day of, and day after. I usually end up the same weight at the end of it all. Sometimes I’ll do a really long bike ride and burn through 1500 calories. Simple math for me – Don’t eat more than you burn.

    5) see #4.

    I’m a very meat and potatoes type guy – I don’t like many vegetables, and I wouldn’t make it 2 days as a vegetarian. I also can’t do low carb diets, as they drag my energy down and give me headaches. I started exercising by doing 20 minutes every other day on a stationary bike, and after almost 2 years, I can’t NOT workout…

  3. On how it feels to eat healthy, I often get comments at work when I pass on the piece of cake. Everyone has learned to accept it at this point, but they still poke fun. But you can tell the difference between respectful needling, and dissing. My boss especially, having watched me eat fanatically for years (protein shakes, green food additives was the worst…they said I was drinking horse, you know), loves to poke fun at my fish and vegetables, while everyone is ordering pizza and double-cheese burgers. But he was the first to proudly tell me he hadn’t had candy for a year. People are uncomfortable in front of healthy eaters, because they know what they should be doing, so they poke fun. But its the good, respectful kind of poking, and I’ve learned to like it. :claphigh:

    phil

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
To prove you're a person (not a spam script), type the security word shown in the picture. Click on the picture to hear an audio file of the word.
Click to hear an audio file of the anti-spam word